Who do you trust more with your private data: Facebook or Apple?
via AP

Who do you trust more with your private data: Facebook or Apple?

#TrustFacebook
#TrustApple
Join the conversation and vote below

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and Apple CEO Tim Cook have sparred for years over how tech companies should handle the private data of users, and Cook recently called for privacy regulation to protect consumers. Facebook has argued that because it is a free platform, it should be allowed to collect data about its users—the users are the product. But Apple follows the "Tim Cook doctrine" that champions privacy as a fundamental human right. Who do you trust more with your private data? 📱

THE VOTES ARE IN!
#TrustFacebook
19.4%
#TrustApple
80.6%

Facebook has had a tough year. Between the Russian meddling in our election to the spread of fake news to the most recent revelations about Cambridge Analytica, Facebook's biggest problem seems to be how it uses (and perhaps abuses) users' data.

In a Facebook post, Zuckerberg claimed Facebook "has a responsibility to protect your data" and allowing apps to access certain information—as Cambridge Analytica did in the form of a personality quiz—is solely meant to allow apps to be more "social."

I want to share an update on the Cambridge Analytica situation... We have a responsibility to protect your data, and if we can't then we don't deserve to serve you.
In 2007, we launched the Facebook Platform with the vision that more apps should be social. Your calendar should be able to show your friends' birthdays, your maps should show where your friends live, and your address book should show their pictures. To do this, we enabled people to log into apps and share who their friends were and some information about them.

Zuckerberg has pushed back against criticism from Apple's Tim Cookarguing Facebook is meant to serve everyone, not just rich people. Zuckerberg has long maintained that Facebook's purpose first and foremost is to connect people, not violate their privacy. Facebook has taken many steps to address users' privacy concerns and Zuckerberg is set to testify before Congress to answer further questions. Does Tim Cook plan to appear before the House Energy and Commerce Committee?

Facebook may not be perfect, but if nothing else, the company seems it will come out of this year stronger than ever when it comes to protecting the private data of its users.

But Apple CEO Tim Cook insists Facebook is in the business of selling data because that's the only way the platform can make money. Unlike Facebook, Apple makes money by actually selling products.

The "Tim Cook Privacy Doctrine" holds up privacy as a fundamental human right:

"We care about the user experience. And we're not going to traffic in your personal life. I think it's an invasion of privacy. I think it's - privacy to us is a human right. It's a civil liberty, and in something that is unique to America, this is like freedom of speech and freedom of the press and privacy is right up there for us. And so, we've always done this. This is not something that we just started last week when we saw something happening. We've been doing this for years."

Of Facebook, Cook said "When an online service is free, you're not the customer. You're the product." Facebook's privacy crisis didn't just start happening, Cook has been criticizing the company's approach to private user data since 2014. Apple famously refused to unlock the iPhone of one of the San Bernardino attackers, despite pressure from the FBI. It's hard to find a tech company more committed to protecting the data of its user than Apple.

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