Is the Democratic Party actually broken?
via AP

Is the Democratic Party actually broken?

#DemocratsAreBroken
#DemocratsAreWinning
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Bernie Sanders insists the Democratic Party is a failure, but primaries in Georgia, Texas, Kentucky, and Arkansas all saw "establishment" Democrats win overwhelmingly. Critics argue the endless "Dems In Disarray" coverage promotes a myth that the party is crumbling while Democrats are actually fielding hundreds of new candidates, winning special elections and supporting one another. Others say Democrats still have a long way to go if they want to win in 2018. What do you think? 🌊

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Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders has long insisted the Democratic Party is broken and the only way for Democrats to win is to embrace more progressive candidates. 

But in reality, the Sanders-inspired "Our Revolution" grassroots organization has failed to win virtually anywhere. Even Stacey Abrams, who was endorsed by "Our Revolution," was also an "establishment" favorite who had the support of national Democrats and Hillary Clinton.

Bernie Sanders’s post-campaign national political organization endorsed two House candidates in fiercely contested primaries — Laura Moser and Rick Treviño—and they both lost rather badly.
Stacey Abrams, who won the Democratic governor’s nomination in Georgia, was also an Our Revolution endorsee, but she was backed by virtually every Democrat with a national political profile, and nobody will see this as a case of Sanders’s support in particular putting her over the top.

"Our Revolution" recently came under fire in a scathing Politico piece, in which Edward-Isaac Dovere stated the organization "can claim no major wins in 2018 as its own."

Our Revolution has shown no ability to tip a major Democratic election in its favor — despite possessing Sanders’ email list, the envy of the Democratic Party — and can claim no major wins in 2018 as its own.

Democrats have flipped 40 legislative seats since Trump's inauguration. Perhaps the party isn't nearly as broken as Bernie thought.

Even those who lost threw their support behind their fellow Democrats. Isn't that a sign of unity? 

But even some loyal Democrats acknowledge there is a divide within the party. "Pod Save America" host Jon Favreau caught heat after he announced his new podcast would be about "what's wrong with the Democratic Party."

Favreau defended himself against attacks, warning against liberal complacency.

Maybe you’re buoyed by the surge in grassroots activism and first-time candidates, and believe the energy we’ve seen from the Women’s March to the March for Our lives will translate into the votes we need to take back Congress, and ultimately the White House. Are you sure?
I was sure once, right before Democrats lost history’s most winnable election to history’s most unpopular candidate. One poll found that two-thirds of Americans believe Democrats are out of touch—including nearly half of Democrats themselves. Not great!

But many Democrats reject Favreau's general premise. The party is winning previously unthinkable races for Democrats (Doug Jones, anyone?) and is carrying huge momentum. Why continue to peddle false narratives about the Democrats as failures?

Others say the truth hurts. According to Reuters, Democrats are losing ground with millennials. And the party hit a 25-year low in popularity, with only 37 percent of Americans saying they view the Democratic Party favorably. 

Democrats are also still debating what their message should be going into 2018. Many Democrats say the party cannot simply run on anti-Trump fervor. They need to be for something, not just against the current president. Plus, the Hillary/Bernie factions are still brawling all over Twitter. The party is indeed in disarray and needs to unite—unless they want to make Trump a two-term president.

But Mark Waldman argues in the Washington Post that no matter what the Democrats do, it will never be enough for the Sanders wing. Hating on Democrats and decrying their "brokenness" is the Bernie left's brand. They're not here to fix anything: they're here to tear the party down. Democrats can and should work to be better, but pleasing Bernie Sanders shouldn't be on their to-do list, ever.

Sanders’ conviction [is] that the party is irredeemably corrupt and a collection of neoliberal corporate sellouts. This is the essence of the Sanders brand; it always has been and always will be. No matter how much the party moves to the left — and it has moved a great deal in the last few years — there will never be a point where Sanders says, “I’m really pleased with where the Democratic Party is right now.” Because once he said that, there would cease to be any need for Bernie Sanders to exist.
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