Should Congress pass a bill to protect Robert Mueller?
via AP

Should Congress pass a bill to protect Robert Mueller?

#ProtectBobMueller
#DontGetInvolved
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As President Trump continues to attack special counsel Robert Mueller, many are urging lawmakers to pass a bill to protect Mueller. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said such a bill "isn't necessary" because he doesn't believe Trump would fire Mueller. Plus, most Republicans don't believe Congress should get involved in the investigation at all. But others believe bipartisan legislation protecting Mueller is a must. To do nothing would invite a constitutional crisis. What do you think? 

THE VOTES ARE IN!
#ProtectBobMueller
61.8%
#DontGetInvolved
38.2%

Trump's attacks on the legitimacy of Robert Mueller's investigation have many worried the president may try to fire the special counsel.

The New York Times reported that Trump tried to fire special counsel Robert Mueller back in June, which reignited urgency among some lawmakers to pass a bill that would shield Mueller from Trump. Bipartisan legislation was drafted last summer to prevent Trump from being able to fire Mueller, but the efforts ultimately fizzled out when Republicans weren't convinced Mueller's investigation was in any danger.

Now that it's clear Mueller is, in fact, in danger of being fired, many are calling on Congress to immediately pass legislation that would make Mueller Trump-proof. It isn't enough to rely on Trump's lawyers; legislation should be passed to ensure if Trump fires Mueller, there will be a process to make sure it was a just firing.

We shouldn’t have to depend on McGahn to ensure that Trump honors the rule of law. Instead, the latest news shows why it’s so urgent for Congress to act to protect Mueller—and to ensure that he can only be fired for good cause.

Many lawmakers have already called on Congress to pass a special counsel protection bill.

But Republicans are skeptical as to whether or not Congress should get directly involved in Mueller's investigation—an investigation some aren't certain is even constitutional. Even critics of the president are unsure as to whether or not legislation would actually accomplish anything. Democratic Sen. Ron Wyden believes the law, as it currently exists now, prohibits Trump from firing Mueller without cause.

But not even Wyden—one of the president’s fiercest critics when it comes to the Russia investigations—committed to supporting legislation to protect the special counsel. “I continue to believe that current law says you can only dismiss an individual like this for cause,” Wyden said. I’m also willing to look at the legislation, but that’s current law that you have to have cause.”

Others still don't believe Trump would fire Mueller because it would be political suicide. Creating legislation has the potential to muddle the legitimacy of the investigation and make it more partisan. Lawmakers should leave Mueller's investigation alone or else they risk undermining the entire process.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell told Fox News on Tuesday he doesn't believe President Donald Trump will fire Robert Mueller, adding he doesn't want legislation on the issue. "I don't think he should fire Mueller and I don't think he's going to," he said in the interview. "So this is a piece of legislation that isn't necessary in my judgment."

And President Trump has said if he wanted to fire Mueller, he would've done so by now.

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