Has Meek Mill been treated unfairly?
via AP

Has Meek Mill been treated unfairly?

#FreedomForMeek
#MeekGottaServe
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Meek Mill was sentenced to two to four years in prison for violating his probation in November, and the Internet petitioned his arrest. In a Rolling Stone interview, Meek suggests he was framed by a corrupt cop in 2007. Supporters continue to chant #FreeMeekMill while claiming the justice system is broken because black citizens get harsher sentences. Prosecutors were reportedly not against early release. Others argue Meek violated his parole four times, and he must do the time. What do you think? ⚖️

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In an interview with Rolling Stone's Paul Solotaroff, Meek touches on how his run-ins with the law are just another example of the unfair treatment of black citizens by a broken judicial system. He also alludes to being framed by a corrupt cop.

Eleven years ago, a drug cop named Reggie Graham claimed he saw Meek Mill, then 19 years old, sell crack to a confidential informant. Graham was attached to a squad called the Narcotics Field Unit, a purportedly elite group of plainclothes cops who target major dealers of crack and heroin. Or so they've been tasked: What they've often done, instead, is embroil themselves in epic – if unpunished – misconduct. "You can practically- set your watch to it – every five years, there's a major NFU scandal," says Brad Bridge, a senior public defender who's locally famous for reversing wrongful convictions. Bridge ballparks the number at about 1,300 reversals; many of those were NFU-related.
Meek waived a jury trial – it costs thousands more in legal fees – so Brinkley decided the case. She acquitted Meek's co-defendants, then found Meek guilty of seven charges – four involving the gun. There's no arguing that Meek had a gun on him; he took the stand and admitted so himself. But in Philly, illegal carry is a misdemeanor, typically punished with a fine and house arrest. Instead, he got two years in a county prison and eight years of strict probation – all because Graham swore he'd seen him sell drugs and aim a weapon at cops. The whole case swung on Graham's testimony, which doesn't pass the laugh test of his former partner. "That boy [Graham] lied like it was second nature!" Walker says. "If you had your weapon drawn, [Meek's] never pulling a gun. The second he raised that weapon, he would've had one breath to live. Straight up and down, they'd have aired him out. We're talking closed casket, not open."

There are some skeptics who are in between. On one hand, Meek did the crime. But on the other hand, the punishment is way too harsh and it shows how the U.S. justice system is problematic.

Meek's lawyer isn't done fighting for him. According to XXL Magazine

Meek Mill is finally one step closer to freedom after the Philadelphia District Attorney agreed the rapper should be given a new hearing. On Monday (April 16), Meek's lawyer announced the rapper was granted a new hearing by Judge Genece Brinkely to discuss the possibility of another trial.
"I just wanted everybody to know, that about 10 minutes ago, the District Attorney of Philadelphia agreed to a new trial for Meek," the rapper's lawyer told a crowd, which erupted into applause.

Last year while on trial, Meek asked for another judge, claiming misconduct by Judge Genece Brinkley. Meek's lawyer Joe Tacopina reportedly claimed the judge asked Meek to leave Roc Nation, and sign with her friend's production company. The attorney also claimed she asked for a shoutout, and for the rapper to cover a Boyz II Men song. Meek believes the judge has a vendetta against him.

Many supporters are calling the justice system broken. This isn't anything new. The system's harsher sentences on black citizens have been blasted and fought against for years. But Meek's celebrity status is bringing visibility to black people going to prison for significant amounts of time for smaller crimes. 

Supporters are providing examples of just how broken the system is. Some fans are comparing Meek's harsh sentencing to the lack of justice for the families of slain black citizens at the hands of white police officers. Community organizers and protesters have been calling for justice and accountability for years.

Plenty of celebrities stood in solidarity with Meek, including Beyoncé and Jay-Z, who declared #FreekMeekMill on DJ Khaled's "Top Off." 

But others disagree. Meek had plenty of opportunities to straighten up.

Critics argue that Meek didn't get his act together, violated his parole four times, and now must serve his time.

Some are saying it's no secret the system is broken, but they are calling out fans who want to see Meek free because of his celebrity. Critics say the conversation should focus on everyday black citizens who deserve second chances or lesser sentences for petty crimes. Not Meek!

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