Favorite suspenseful horror flick: 'Get Out' or 'A Quiet Place'?
via Paramount Pictures

Favorite suspenseful horror flick: 'Get Out' or 'A Quiet Place'?

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"A Quiet Place" opened to positive reviews, winning the top spot at the U.S. box office opening weekend. Just one year ago, another critically praised horror film, "Get Out," was released and went on to become the definitive horror flick of 2017 and an Oscar-nominated commercial success. Horror fans acknowledge both genius films were directed by comedic actors—Jordan Peele and John Krasinski, respectively. Which of these surprises horror successes is your favorite? 🎬

THE VOTES ARE IN!
#TeamGetOut
52.5%
#TeamAQuietPlace
47.5%

Both films have deeper meanings, twists, and turns—proving there's a resurgence in suspenseful, scary movies. Both films were directed by comedic actors too. 

Below is the synopsis of "Get Out," per IMDB

A young African-American visits his white girlfriend's parents for the weekend, where his simmering uneasiness about their reception of him eventually reaches a boiling point.

"Get Out" hold a 99 percent fresh rating on Rotten Tomatoes. The film scored five Oscar nominations in 2018, winning Best Original Screenplay. The critically acclaimed awards darling won over audiences by highlighting the scary reality of facing white supremacy while being black in America. 

Time's Stephanie Zacharek wrote: 

Peele succeeds where sometimes even more experienced filmmakers fail: He's made an agile entertainment whose social and cultural observations are woven so tightly into the fabric that you're laughing even as you're thinking, and vice-versa.

Below is the synopsis of "A Quiet Place," per IMDB

A family is forced to live in silence while hiding from creatures that hunt by sound.

"A Quiet Place" holds a 96 percent fresh rating on Rotten Tomatoes. Variety's Rebecca Rubin listed all the reasons why "A Quiet Place" is winning.

Horror movies usually have a simple premise, but it’s a film with a deeper message that can truly grab an audience. That was the case for racial satire “Get Out,” and to a lesser degree, the same could be said for “A Quiet Place.” At its core, Krasinski told Variety the movie is a metaphor for “parenthood, the idea of protecting your kids, and how far would you go to protect them.” However, critics have also pointed to the apocalyptic monster movie’s parallels of political unrest in America. “The deeper a film can go in terms of messages, the stronger it will be in terms of targeting more of a demographic,” Bock said.
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